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Europe's testing and classification system for building products, which form the basis of the CE marking.

Classification of wood products according to EN13501-1:2007+A1:2009 involves initial typing tests according to test method EN13823:2010 for Euro classes B and C and specific for each type of wood as well as including mounting conditions, e.g. mounting on A2 substrate with or without air gap, or backing substrate of D-s2, d0 with or without air gap and so on. The test result is based on the classification of the product/wood classification according to classification standard EN13501-1:2007+A1:2009 within performance groups B, C, D, E, F.
Please note that the stipulations of construction documents shall not be in accordance with the classification standard EN13501-1, stipulation in construction documents shall be against declaration of performance in accordance with a harmonized product standard. Not really a difference in substance, more a formality, the fire class is the same but must be referred to the correct regulations. Stipulation in construction documents shall be against a harmonized product standard where the EU imposes a CE marking of solid wood and wood-based boards in accordance with EN14915: 2013 or EN13986: 2004 + A1: 2015.

Fire class B and C regulations require mandatory CE marking and a performance declaration, known as DoP.

Regular untreated wood is classified as D-s2, d0 according to CWFT. To keep in mind is that certain products that are durability impregnated, e.g. with linseed oil, pine oil, mineral oil etc, are often marketed as D-performance in guidelines for wood covered by CWFT, but is it so? There are indications that e.g. linseed oil impregnated wood panels do not meet Euroclass D. Such products meet Class E and thus do not meet the requirements of e.g. BBR for the lowest requirement for wood with euro class D. Always request third-party documentation that shows that e.g. linseed oil impregnated wood meets Euroclass D according to SS-EN13501-1 as an absolute minimum requirement.

TIP: Regardless of the type of wood product to be used, only third-party verification is based on properties that are higher than the natural type of wood, which in practice means that the manufacturer himself can declare performance D-s2, d0 in a declaration of performance, even if this is not the case. Never accept such documentation, request a classification report of linseed, pine, mineral, silicate impregnated products for which there is no CE certificate (Certificate of Constancy of Performance).

PLEASE REMEMBER that industrial impregnated woods are always subject to compulsary requirements for CE marking and performance declarations when Euroclasses B and C are marketed.

Fire protection impregnated wood products without CE marking may not be marketed nor used in accordance with EU Building Products Regulation 305/2011.

Wood can never achieve Euro class A1 or A2 because wood is an organic combustible material. There are operators who claim to be able to do so, but this is untrue.

The highest classification wood can achieve is euro class B with additional index -s1 and -d0 written as B-s1, d0.

Product with performance C-s2, d0 is lower performance than Euroclass B, but higher than the wood's own performance, which is D-s2, d0 (CWFT).

Certain wood processing processes for enhanced durability can cause deterioration of fire-resistant properties in the wood, which may result in the wood falling within the framework to Euroclass F.

EURO CLASS B is the highest performance wood can achieve, with additional index -s1, s2, s3 and -d0, d1, d2.

The highest grade of wood is B-s1, d0. Index values -s, and -d are additions that indicate the production of a little or a lot of smoke as well as the presence of burning particles and droplets.

In terms of s-values, s1 is the lowest smoke development and is always provided indoors.

It is important to check whether the product's performance includes an air gap or just installation on the substrate.

EURO CLASS C: Building regulations provide for this mainly in smaller rooms, with a small number of people in the premises, private housing and in walls in combination with sprinklers.

EURO CLASS D: The wood's own natural performance i.e. reaction to fire according to CWFT.

EURO CLASS F: This performance is worse than natural wood, and in principle, it cannot be used where fire technology requirements are imposed. Certain processing processes against durability generate higher FIGRA than the wood itself generates, such as Euroclass D, and thus the performance of the product can deteriorate to be classified according to Euroclass F.

Euroclass table

Euroclass

Smoke class

Burning particles

Requirements according to

FIGRA

Product examples

Non-flammable

SBI

Small flame

W/s

A1

-

-

X

-

-

-

Stone, glass, steel

A2

s1, s2 or s3

d0, d1 or d2

X

X

-

≤ 120

Plasterboard (thin paper), mineral wool

B

s1, s2 or s3

d0, d1 or d2

-

X

X

≤ 120

Plasterboard (thick paper), flame retardant wood

C

s1, s2 or s3

d0, d1 or d2

-

X

X

≤ 250

Wallpaper on plasterboard, flame retardant wood

D

s1, s2 or s3

d0, d1 or d2

-

X

X

≤ 750

Wood and wood-based boards

E

-

- or d2

-

-

X

-

Some synthetic materials, but also resistance-impregnated (rot) methods occurs.

F

-

-

-

-

-

-

No fire class determined

SBI = Single Burning Item, EN 13823, main method for surface materials except floorings.
FIGRA = FIre Growth RAte, most important parameter for fire class according to the SBI method.